Book Review: Interview with the Vampire

Posted: October 7, 2014 in Book Review
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Story 7

Writing 7.5

Characters 7.5

Readability 7

I can almost hear you groaning as I tell you I’m reviewing a book about vampires. But please don’t worry, these vampires don’t sparkle in daylight but they do burst into flame and they don’t drink blood for some sort of sexual pleasure, they do it to survive. These are the vampires of old, the ones you love to fear.

And then suddenly I remembered two conflicting things and was torn in agony: I remembered the powerful beating of her heart against mine and i hungered for it, hungered for it so badly I turned my back on her in the bed and would have rushed out of the room had not Lestat held me hast; and I remembered her mother’s face and that moment of horror when I’d dropped the child and he’d come into the room.

Published in 1976, Anne Rice’s novel follows the main character Louis as he is transformed from man to Vampire, by his companion Lestat. This books is less about Vampires killing without remorse, but more about searching for meaning in immortality. How does someone justify living forever at the cost someone’s life everyday?

The story follows Louis, Lestat and later Claudia as they explore America and Europe in search for other Vampires like themselves. The story is given direction as Louis slowly loses his humanity and replacing it with the coldness that defines all other Vampires. But whether he will be able to shed all humanity (as other Vampires before him have done) and therefore find peace of mind will be a hard task.

Another interesting part of this book is that it told in retrospect as Louis is interviewed by a nameless ‘boy’. This means the story is both told in present and past tense giving Louis a chance to reflect on his journey (and we are given that same opportunity through him). it also sets up the feeling that a long period of time passes throughout the telling of the story.

This book is philosophical in its approach to exploring human nature. It forges complex characters who challenge the idea of what it is to be ‘good’ and what it is to be ‘evil’. It’s book one in a long series and definitely worth a read!

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